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answers to your questions about senior pictures


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answers to your questions about senior pictures

Your teenager's senior pictures are an important part of his or her high school experience. These pictures will be included in graduation party invitations, sent out to family members to share the good news, and placed in the school year book for everyone to see for years to come. How do you get the perfect senior picture? Do you have the pictures taken inside or outside? Do you use a professional photographer? How much should they cost? These and many other questions are answered on my site to help other parents get through a stressful situation with less stress than I did.

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Informed And Involved: Key To Successful Assisted Living

Do you have a parent who just moved into an assisted living senior care facility? If so, perhaps you feel a little uneasy. You may wonder if this is the right level of care for your mom or dad. What if there is an emergency? Will others notice if your parent's health or state of mind starts to decline? Your concerns are both rational and justified, and overall you are probably experiencing some anxiety as your parent ages. Nearly 10 million Americans are dealing with the issue of aging parents, so you have a lot of company. Assisted living facilities differ in the services they offer to their residents, so it's a good idea to get informed about your parent's facility and stay involved as much as possible. Here are some guidelines for you to help keep tabs on your parent's living situation.

1. Get in the know

The first thing to do when your parent moves into an assisted living senior care facility is to get to know people. Request a meeting with the program manager, for instance, to introduce yourself and clarify any concerns you have about your parent's well-being. Ask questions such as

  • How often will staff members interact with your parent?

  • Will staff members check on your parent on a regular basis?

  • What is the facility's protocol when a resident's mental or physical health declines? What resources are available in such situations, and at what point should you expect a phone call?

Beyond the facility manager, introduce yourself to staff members you see during visits, as well as to the new friends your parent makes. Where it seems appropriate, offer your phone number so they can contact you if necessary.

2. Set a routine

Elderly people thrive on routine. You may remember a grandparent who ate dinner at the same time every day, or who went to the movies every Tuesday. You can best stay involved with your parent by visiting consistently so that there will be an ongoing line of communication between you. Besides the fact that your parent can look forward to your visits, the frequent contact will reveal to you any problematic changes in his/her health. Suggestions:

  • try to visit the same day or time every week

  • perhaps take your parent grocery shopping, to church, or out for a leisure activity

  • if you can't visit, or desire more frequent contact, call him/her to check in

3. Keep your eyes open

What kinds of changes should you be alert to during your visits that signal potential problems?

Look for the following

  • memory loss

  • changes in appearance, such as weight loss/gain or neglect of daily hygiene

  • changes in mood, such as irritability or sadness that is uncharacteristic

  • signs of injury that indicate your parent had a fall

  • change in activity level, such as withdrawing from friends

If you aren't seeing any of these changes in your parent, you can be confident that assisted living is the right level of care. If you are seeing issues that concern you, the facility staff and your parent's doctor can help you transition him/her to a higher level of care.

Getting to know the facility staff, maintaining regular contact with your parent, and watching for any changes in his/her overall health will all help ease your mind. Being informed and staying involved is key to making sure your parent is both healthy and happy. Walking through the golden years alongside your mom or dad can be a challenging time, to which many people in this country will attest. However, an assisted living program that will work with you and your parent will make all the difference.